THE BOMBAY SEMINARY: It’s D-DAY!

 October 5, 1960 – The brand new Bombay Seminary at Goregaon was declared open by His Eminence Gregory Peter Cardinal Agagianian. Undoubtedly, the story of this memorable day is deeply etched in the storeys of the Bombay Seminary. Today we invite you to sit back, relax, and time-travel as we relive this unique unforgettable landmark in the history of our Archdiocese through word and imagery.

Although the Seminary started functioning in July 1960, all eyes and hearts looked forward to October 5, the day fixed for the official inauguration. Finally, the D-Day dawned in the full light of publicity mingled with exuberant excitement. Even the Times of India published a special supplement in honor of the New Seminary. All roads seemed to lead to Goregaon!

Road-side trees carried directions to lead the visitors to the Seminary. Groups from distant districts took a day off to camp on the grounds and were ready to take their appointed places for the function much ahead of the schedule. Special parking facilities were arranged for the cars that came rolling in from all over Bombay and its suburbs. Seldom was a gathering of the Catholics of the Archdiocese seen as the one on that memorable day.’ (Msgr Bento De Souza)

On the morning of October 5, a gathering of three Cardinals, around fifteen Archbishops, and thirty Bishops assembled in the Aula Magna of the Seminary. Here the Cardinal Prefect delivered an exhortation encouraging the clergy to be true to the ideals of the priestly holiness which the patron of the Seminary, St. Pius X, outlined in his encyclical ‘Haerent Animo’. After that, a grand luncheon was held in the new Seminary Hall dedicated to St. Pope John XXIII. In the evening, a little before the main event, the Seminary building was blessed by Cardinal Santos of Manila.

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